OVERGROUND RAILROAD: THE GREEN BOOK AND THE ROOTS OF BLACK TRAVEL IN AMERICA

$35.00

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The first book to explore the historical role and residual impact of the Green Book, a travel guide for black motorists

Published from 1936 to 1966, the Green Book was hailed as the “black travel guide to America.” At that time, it was very dangerous and difficult for African-Americans to travel because black travelers couldn’t eat, sleep, or buy gas at most white-owned businesses. The Green Book listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, and other businesses that were safe for black travelers. It was a resourceful and innovative solution to a horrific problem. It took courage to be listed in the Green Book, and Overground Railroad celebrates the stories of those who put their names in the book and stood up against segregation. It shows the history of the Green Book, how we arrived at our present historical moment, and how far we still have to go when it comes to race relations in America.

“In scope and tone, “Overground Railroad” recalls Isabel Wilkerson’s “The Warmth of Other Suns…At its center, the book is a nuanced commentary of how black bodies have been monitored, censured or violated, and it compellingly pulls readers into the current news cycle.”
— The Los Angeles Times

“…a fascinating history of black travel.. telling the sweeping story of black travel within Jim Crow America across four decades.”
— The New York Times Book Review

“The strength of this book about a book lies in the street-level views through which the American road unspools in all its compromised glory.”
— The Economist

“A fascinating look at a groundbreaking guide.”
— The New York Post

Additional information

Weight 42.4 oz
Dimensions 9.6 × 6.5 × 1.7 in
Author(s)Candacy Taylor
Publisher(s)Harry N. Abrams
CoverHard Cover
Year of Publication2020